Soccer's Uglies- From Dead Rats to Deadly Riots

Posted

Last week’s soccer match between Danish rivals FC Copenhagen and Brondby IF introduced the latest form of fan misbehavior- tossing dead rats on the field.

Vile but harmless, hurling lifeless rodents on the pitch is still a benign act by historical standards for the world’s most popular sport.

Even pigs fly in heated soccer matches. At a 2002 game between bitter enemies Barcelona and Real Madrid, enraged fans who felt betrayed by star player Luis Figa’s move from Barca to Madrid, threw a pig’s head on the field.

From the Latin fanaticus, translating to “insanely but divinely inspired”, fan misconduct at sporting events is as old as the spirit of competition.

But when the atmosphere becomes unruly, impassioned fans can resort to more than just animal carcasses. Soccer violence is universal just like the game itself, and on occasion turns deadly.

British hooliganism reached its peak at the 1985 EuroCup Final when Liverpool met Juventus at Heysel Stadium in Brussels.

Following a period of stone throwing exchanges inside the poorly maintained arena, 39 people suffocated to death when English fans stormed the Italian side and chased a fleeing crowd (photo above) against a retaining wall.

For the next five years, English clubs were banned from participating in the continent's competitions; Liverpool was disallowed for an additional year.

More recently in 2012, over 70 people were killed in Egypt at a riot following a match between the country’s El Masry and El Ahly soccer teams. Due to political reasons as well, the government shut down the domestic league for two years.

Poor crowd control and inadequate facility management exacerbated fatalities at most stadium incidents.

The deadliest match recorded in soccer history took place in 1964 when Peru hosted Argentina in a qualifying round for the Tokyo Olympic tournament. A controversial call against Peru sent angry fans into the field where they were met by police. Pandemonium ensued as tear gas was fired inside the stadium, while spectators were crushed against exit gates that were locked. 328 people were killed.

Thirty seven years later in 2001, similar mayhem broke out in Ghana when the country’s two most prominent teams, the Asante Kotoko and Accra Hearts, took to the field. Despite extra security, violence between fans led to police intervention and a massive exit stampede. 126 spectators were killed in what became Africa’s worst sporting disaster.

Europe’s deadliest soccer match, initially attributed to fan misbehavior, ended up as an indictment against police incompetence.

In 1989, Liverpool and Nottingham Forest faced off in a semi-final match at Hillsborough Stadium in neutral Sheffield. 96 fans were crushed to death when gates were opened on the Liverpool spectators side to allow more people into an already overcrowded pen area.

Police insisted that hooliganism and excessive drinking were responsible for the disaster, but years of persistent investigations by families of those killed proved otherwise.

As late as 2016, twenty seven years after the Hillsborough tragedy unfolded, families were vindicated when a jury ruled that the victims were “unlawfully killed” and that Liverpool supporters played no part in the disaster.

Comments

No comments on this story | Please log in to comment by clicking here
Please log in or register to add your comment

Shop For Our Books & DVD's

WEEKLY SPORTS PUZZLE

View larger Puzzle archive


THIS WEEK

10 years ago

FOOTBALL October 12, 2008  The Arizona Cardinals beat the Dallas Cowboys 30-24 in overtime. The Cards started off the game with a 93-yard kickoff return for a touchdown and ended it with a blocked punt recovery for 3 yards. They wrapped up the season 9-7 and eventually made the Super Bowl, but were taken down by the Steelers 27-23 for the crown.

20 years ago

BASEBALL October 14, 1998  The San Diego Padres defeat the Atlanta Braves 4-2 to win the National League title. They went on to face the NY Yankees at the World Series but lost the championship after being swept 4-0.  Founded in 1969, the Padres never won a World Series but were National League champs twice, in 1984 and 1998.

30 years ago

HORSE RACING October 13, 1988  Jockey Mike Venezia is killed in an accident at Belmont Park after he is thrown off his horse and trampled by a trailing horse. Venezia rode 2,313 winners in his career and was President of the Jockeys’ Guild from 1975-81. In December, 1964, he won 6 races in just a single day at Aqueduct Racetrack.

40 years ago

AUTO RACING October 8, 1978  American race car driver Mario Andretti wins the F1 Driver’s World Championship. Andretti claimed 6 of the 16 Formula One races that season and today remains the last American to lift an F1 trophy. The Italian-born racer is only one of two drivers to have won the F1, Indycar, NASCAR, and World Sportscar Championship.