The Boston Marathon- 121 Years And Running

Posted 4/16/17

“The Runners Are Coming, The Runners Are Coming!”. Famous for launching the American revolution in the 18th century, Boston was also the first city to kick off an annual marathon in 1897.

This item is available in full to subscribers.

Please log in to continue

Log in

The Boston Marathon- 121 Years And Running

Posted

“The Runners Are Coming, The Runners Are Coming!”. Famous for launching the American revolution in the 18th century, Boston was also the first city to kick off an annual marathon in 1897.

“Beantown” is one of six cities to host a World Marathon Major; the others are Tokyo, London, Berlin, Chicago, New York. But the New England race predates the rest by what seems like marathons in the decades making- New York’s pavement chase is the second oldest and it didn’t get going until 1970.

Inspired by the first Olympics in 1896, the Boston Athletic Association held a 24½ mile race on Patriots Day, April 19, 1897, to complete the club’s athletic tournament. The stated goal in their charter- “to encourage all manly sports and promote physical culture”.

New York native John J. McDermott won the inaugural event from a field of 18 hopefuls, crossing the finish line with a time of 2:55:10. The 25-year old took the lead 12 miles into the race, holding his position to a bloodied and blistered end.

By 1924, the course was lengthened to conform with Olympic standards of 26 miles, 385 yards (42.195 km). The number of ground-pounding athletes also grew to 147 and that figure cleared 1,000 for the first time in 1968. Forty-eight years later, 30,741 entrants would register for the bipedal extravaganza.

American Bill Rodgers holds the record for winning the Boston Marathon four times- 1975 & 1978-80 (photo above). Geoffrey Mutai of Kenya ran the fastest, clocking the race at 2:03:02 in 2011. Buzunesh Deba of Ethiopia tops the women’s category at 2:19:59 posted in 2014.

Women were officially permitted to join in 1972, though their “pioneering era” stretched back to 1966, a period only recognized by officials decades later. Massachusetts native Roberta Gibb was the first female to clear the finish line in 1966, recording a time of 3:21:40. She retained her title for the next two years.

Marathoners historically competed for honor, glory and an olive branch wreath at the close, but the first cash prize came in 1986. Boston’s first run for the money was won by Australian Rob de Castella who took $60,000, a Mercedes-Benz, plus miscellaneous awards for finishing in 2:07:51.

This year, the long distance champs will walk away with $150,000 each for men and women, plus performance bonuses. Wheel chair winners will pocket $20,000.

The tragic bombing in 2013 that killed three people and injured hundreds was made that much more heartfelt for a city that represents the marathon tradition and its longevity.

To that, we say 121 years and running !

SPORTS HISTORY MAGAZINE in DIGITAL

Winter 2021

Fall 2020

Summer 2020

Spring 2020

Comments

No comments on this story | Please log in to comment by clicking here
Please log in or register to add your comment

Shop For Our Books & DVD's

CURRENT ISSUE

WEEKLY SPORTS PUZZLE

View larger Puzzle archive


THIS WEEK

10 years ago

FOOTBALL February 6, 2011  The Green Bay Packers defeat the Pittsburgh Steelers 31-25 in Super Bowl XLV. Packers quarterback, Aaron Rodgers, launched 3 touchdowns and completed 24 of 39 passes to win the game MVP. His counterpart, Ben Roethlisberger, hurled 2 touchdowns and 2 interceptions, one of which resulted in a 37-yard running score against Pittsburgh. It was the 4th SB victory for Green Bay, the NFL’s first champions dating back to the 1966 season.

20 years ago

BASKETBALL February 11, 2001  The NBA holds its 50th All-Star game at the MCI Center in Washington, DC. Allen Iverson picked up the MVP after rallying the Eastern Conference to defeat the West in a narrow 111-110 game. Vince Carter (Toronto Raptors) and Iverson (Philadelphia 76ers) topped the highest number of selection votes from the East, while Shaquille O’Neal (Los Angeles Lakers) and Kobe Bryant (Los Angeles Lakers) were most popular in the West.

30 years ago

BASEBALL February 4, 1991  The Board of Directors at the Baseball Hall of Fame votes 12-0 to bar Pete Rose from being inducted. Due to his past gambling activities around the game, both as player and manager, Rose continues to be kept out of the prestigious institution. Playing for and managing the Cincinnati Reds from 1963-1989, Rose was a 17x All-Star and 3x World Series champion. In his playing career he batted .303, hit 4,256, and had RBI of 1,413.

40 years ago

MOTOR SPORTS February 15, 1981  Rich Petty wins the 23rd annual running of the Daytona 500. Rounding the 200-lap chase in just under 2 hours and 57 minutes, Petty beat Bobby Allison by 3½ seconds and brought out Buick’s first NASCAR win since 1956. It was the 7th and last Daytona 500 victory for the North Carolina native who still holds the record for most wins at the famed track. Petty is tied with Jimmy Johnson and Dale Earnhardt for the NASCAR series (7x).